9 videos
  • Live
    by Benjamin Meyers 173 0 0
    173 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • tom and jarry
    by Peter Ross 0 0 0
    ......
    0 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • iOS & OS X — Sharing Code / Common Technologies - StuFF mc
    by YouNet Company 180 0 0
    It all started with this Universal iOS App I started building — basically a game for Young Kids. It involved using Store Kit and me hating to not be able to test it on the simulator. Add Game Center to that, the publicly known fact that I'm an OS X Lover, and all of a sudden I had a "really universal" App, looking pretty much the same on iOS than on the Mac, but most importantly sharing a good amount of code. Mostly StoreKit & GameCenter, but also a few parts of the logic by using correctly placed (I think) #defines here and there, so that a NSView and a UIView all of a sudden is "the same beast". Oh yeah, and Categories — mostly to fix Apple's incoherent coherence in APIs. Let me show you a few of the techniques I used.
    180 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • 24.01.11 - Christoph Schindler
    by YouNet Company 202 0 0
    An architectural periodization model with criteria of production technology, as illustrated with the example of timber construction. _ Contemporary production technology is about to exert an influence on the development of architecture as fundamentally as experienced during Industrialization in the 19th century. While new computer-aided methods are widely discussed and applied, their roots and relation to previous production technology remain obscure. Christoph Schindler analyzes architecture from the perspective of production technology. He aims to contextualize contemporary research in the building industry—driven by information technology—and identify it as part of a continuous development in history of technology. The thesis is built around the scheme of a periodization model, which intends to integrate fabrication within manual, industrial and information technology. It is based on the relation between the three categories matter, energy, and information in each respective period. The validity of the model is proven with help of history of timber architecture, as no other construction method illustrates the relation between processing technology, fabrication methods and architecture more comprehensively over a comparable period of time. It is studied whether the proposed model can be circumstantiated with historical facts—how constitutive changes in process technology influenced wood processing and how they respectively coined construction and appearance of timber architecture. For more information about this lecture go to: mas.caad.arch.ethz.ch/​mas1011/​
    202 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • 29.11.2011. Ludger Hovestadt
    by YouNet Company 215 0 0
    Programming for architects has become a very popular topic in the last years. Tools have become simpler, computers faster, tutorials and are online available as video, there are huge amounts of examples ready to copy and play. In this scenario we face one major problem: the programming languages and the tutorials suggest direct recipes for fast solutions, whatever the problem may be. They are pretty successful in the sense that with their help, everybody can produce very fast the very same results. This scenario is a symptom of the – we call it – aggressive cultural ignorance of cybernetics. In contrast to the major articulations in this field, we do not think, that there is any truth or meaning in what a program can produce. Even if our algorithms generate forms that look strangely familiar to us, because they resemble some biological or natural phenomena, they are not cracking some immediate code of nature. In what computers can produce, we find a mirroring of the categories of our thinking, knowledge, and our tools. If we take code for natural in any sense, we are heading towards a naked and most extreme reductionist functionalism. To bypass such un-ingenuous schematism, his module sets out with cultural, mathematical, and technological implications contained within the different programming paradigms to develop a rich understanding of the power of coding. Coding means orchestrating cultural déjà vus. By coding we are sheaving rich symbolizations to work within a digital architectonics that is constituted by our assignations of value to the old and familiar, as articulations for attention within an open competition among our contemporaries. CODING I is a 4 week course and will concentrate on the media of digital graphics and images. We will exercise different levels of abstraction towards images, to get an understanding of different ways of thinking that have evolved throughout the past centuries. This path will leas us from magnitude to what we call multitudes, and on to the contemporary indexes whose subsumption can be understood as potitudes. CODING II will follow the same didactical line, but concentrate on 3D objects and vectors. It will link more directly to traditional CAAD and computer architecture. The emphasis on images as objects of our exercises in CODING is chosen because this is technically less challenging and therefore suitable for a first round of this challenging program. The exercises are in Processing and Java.
    215 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • Ben Shaffer: Innovation Means Building a Safe Space for Failure
    by YouNet Company 203 0 0
    You can’t get to the really brilliant ideas without first building off of the really awful ones. In the Nike Kitchen, the shoe company’s innovation lab responsible for the genre-busting Nike Flyknit (as seen in the 2012 Olympics and 2014 World Cup), the company focuses on building a safe space for failure to help push the envelope and develop completely new products. “By having an area where we can incubate and build, and not necessarily always worry about what a failure it is, we understand that we can learn from it. It really allows us to amplify and create new seedlings, off which we can build more crops,” explains Shaffer. But the most important part of innovating, says Shaffer, is including your user in the entire process: “For us, having that single focus, which is our athlete, and listening to and observing them from the beginning of a project all the way through to the end is extremely vital.” About Ben Shaffer Benjamin Shaffer is a designer/innovator who lives and works in Portland. As the designer and creative lead of Nike Flyknit he orchestrated the growth of a new paradigm shift in footwear manufacturing that was introduced in the 2012 Olympics on the feet of the some of the world’s fastest athletes. Then as a Studio Director, his passion for new materials and processes of making and a keen eye for aesthetic relevance positioned him nicely at the incubation of Nike’s future product within the Innovation Kitchen. He is now a designer at Apple. In a journey that began 12 years ago with Nike, Shaffer has designed products from a variety of categories ranging from Yoga, Dance, and Running, as well as contributing to the conceptualization of Nike Plus. Six years in, he joined the Innovation Kitchen assisting the Women’s Training team with their Diamond Flex technologies, Free, and performance calibration as their Innovation Lead. From there he transitioned to be the Innovation Lead of Sportswear where he was charged with designing, developing, and introducing technologies such as Nike’s Hyperfuse into Sportswear.
    203 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • Designer Cameron Moll on Natural Mapping
    by YouNet Company 190 0 0
    Cameron Moll discusses natural mapping at An Event Apart New Orleans 2008. Shot by Bonnemaison (http://bonnemaison.com/) of Baltimore, MD. Edited by Ian Corey. ===== CAMERON MOLL: [Talking about his uncle, a computer novice.] He bought one of those early iMacs and that was his first computing experience. He brought me over one day. He asked me to come fix something on his computer. I don't remember what it was, but I said, sure, let me see what I can do. CAMERON MOLL: So I sat down with him. This is essentially what his Finder looked like. Now, he'd never been exposed to computing before, so he didn't understand directories and lists and things like that. He treated the computer as if it were this physical object. So imagine his Finder being something just like a giant table. And he would take files and set them on the table [demonstrates] in groups and categories. CAMERON MOLL: He was big into fishing. So over here, he'd have anything related to fishing. Pictures and web addresses and so forth. Also big into airplanes, so over here, something related to airplanes and so forth. CAMERON MOLL: So if this was a physical object, his Finder, it would have been something like four by six feet. There were probably two or three times as many files as I'm showing here, I kind of recreated this. Probably had somewhere in the neighborhood of 400 to 500 files in this Finder set up just like this. CAMERON MOLL: And so I said, you know what? I can't fix this problem this other problem you've asked me to fix until I fix this one. I can't even get through these files. CAMERON MOLL: And so here's what I did. I thought I'd help him out by cleaning up that nasty arrangement of icons. [AUDIENCE LAUGHTER] CAMERON MOLL: Now I cannot articulate the look on his face when I did that. [AUDIENCE LAUGHTER] Because as you know, this is not un-doable.
    190 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • Databases are Categories 2: Refinements and Extensions
    by YouNet Company 201 0 0
    abstract: About five months ago I gave a talk here at Galois called “Databases are categories.” The basic idea was that a database schema can be represented as a category C and its states can be represented as functors C–Set. In this talk I’ll refine that notion a bit, explaining that schemas are better represented as sketches. I’ll also show how, within this model one can: deal with incomplete data; incorporate typing and calculated fields; and perform queries, define views, and migrate data between disparate schemas. That is, I’ll try to show that the categorical approach handles everything one might hope it would. Finally, I’ll discuss a linguistic version of categories, called “ologs,” and show how they may help to democratize information storage. bio: I received my PhD in mathematics from UC Berkeley in 2007; my thesis was in Algebraic Topology. For the next three years I was a post doc in the math department at the University of Oregon. During this time my focus moved toward using category theory to understand information and communication. This past summer (2010) I began a post doc in the math department at MIT. My main interest at the moment is in using category theory to bridge the gap between disparate academic fields, and to generally enhance our ability to record, process, and communicate information.
    201 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • Databases are Categories
    by YouNet Company 189 0 0
    Talk presented by David Spivak on June 3, 2010, part of the Galois Tech Talk series. See http://www.galois.com/blog/2010/05/27/tech-talk-categories-are-databases/ for slides and further information.
    189 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • Live
    by Benjamin Meyers 173 0 0
    173 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • tom and jarry
    by Peter Ross 0 0 0
    ......
    0 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • iOS & OS X — Sharing Code / Common Technologies - StuFF mc
    by YouNet Company 180 0 0
    It all started with this Universal iOS App I started building — basically a game for Young Kids. It involved using Store Kit and me hating to not be able to test it on the simulator. Add Game Center to that, the publicly known fact that I'm an OS X Lover, and all of a sudden I had a "really universal" App, looking pretty much the same on iOS than on the Mac, but most importantly sharing a good amount of code. Mostly StoreKit & GameCenter, but also a few parts of the logic by using correctly placed (I think) #defines here and there, so that a NSView and a UIView all of a sudden is "the same beast". Oh yeah, and Categories — mostly to fix Apple's incoherent coherence in APIs. Let me show you a few of the techniques I used.
    180 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • 24.01.11 - Christoph Schindler
    by YouNet Company 202 0 0
    An architectural periodization model with criteria of production technology, as illustrated with the example of timber construction. _ Contemporary production technology is about to exert an influence on the development of architecture as fundamentally as experienced during Industrialization in the 19th century. While new computer-aided methods are widely discussed and applied, their roots and relation to previous production technology remain obscure. Christoph Schindler analyzes architecture from the perspective of production technology. He aims to contextualize contemporary research in the building industry—driven by information technology—and identify it as part of a continuous development in history of technology. The thesis is built around the scheme of a periodization model, which intends to integrate fabrication within manual, industrial and information technology. It is based on the relation between the three categories matter, energy, and information in each respective period. The validity of the model is proven with help of history of timber architecture, as no other construction method illustrates the relation between processing technology, fabrication methods and architecture more comprehensively over a comparable period of time. It is studied whether the proposed model can be circumstantiated with historical facts—how constitutive changes in process technology influenced wood processing and how they respectively coined construction and appearance of timber architecture. For more information about this lecture go to: mas.caad.arch.ethz.ch/​mas1011/​
    202 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • 29.11.2011. Ludger Hovestadt
    by YouNet Company 215 0 0
    Programming for architects has become a very popular topic in the last years. Tools have become simpler, computers faster, tutorials and are online available as video, there are huge amounts of examples ready to copy and play. In this scenario we face one major problem: the programming languages and the tutorials suggest direct recipes for fast solutions, whatever the problem may be. They are pretty successful in the sense that with their help, everybody can produce very fast the very same results. This scenario is a symptom of the – we call it – aggressive cultural ignorance of cybernetics. In contrast to the major articulations in this field, we do not think, that there is any truth or meaning in what a program can produce. Even if our algorithms generate forms that look strangely familiar to us, because they resemble some biological or natural phenomena, they are not cracking some immediate code of nature. In what computers can produce, we find a mirroring of the categories of our thinking, knowledge, and our tools. If we take code for natural in any sense, we are heading towards a naked and most extreme reductionist functionalism. To bypass such un-ingenuous schematism, his module sets out with cultural, mathematical, and technological implications contained within the different programming paradigms to develop a rich understanding of the power of coding. Coding means orchestrating cultural déjà vus. By coding we are sheaving rich symbolizations to work within a digital architectonics that is constituted by our assignations of value to the old and familiar, as articulations for attention within an open competition among our contemporaries. CODING I is a 4 week course and will concentrate on the media of digital graphics and images. We will exercise different levels of abstraction towards images, to get an understanding of different ways of thinking that have evolved throughout the past centuries. This path will leas us from magnitude to what we call multitudes, and on to the contemporary indexes whose subsumption can be understood as potitudes. CODING II will follow the same didactical line, but concentrate on 3D objects and vectors. It will link more directly to traditional CAAD and computer architecture. The emphasis on images as objects of our exercises in CODING is chosen because this is technically less challenging and therefore suitable for a first round of this challenging program. The exercises are in Processing and Java.
    215 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • Ben Shaffer: Innovation Means Building a Safe Space for Failure
    by YouNet Company 203 0 0
    You can’t get to the really brilliant ideas without first building off of the really awful ones. In the Nike Kitchen, the shoe company’s innovation lab responsible for the genre-busting Nike Flyknit (as seen in the 2012 Olympics and 2014 World Cup), the company focuses on building a safe space for failure to help push the envelope and develop completely new products. “By having an area where we can incubate and build, and not necessarily always worry about what a failure it is, we understand that we can learn from it. It really allows us to amplify and create new seedlings, off which we can build more crops,” explains Shaffer. But the most important part of innovating, says Shaffer, is including your user in the entire process: “For us, having that single focus, which is our athlete, and listening to and observing them from the beginning of a project all the way through to the end is extremely vital.” About Ben Shaffer Benjamin Shaffer is a designer/innovator who lives and works in Portland. As the designer and creative lead of Nike Flyknit he orchestrated the growth of a new paradigm shift in footwear manufacturing that was introduced in the 2012 Olympics on the feet of the some of the world’s fastest athletes. Then as a Studio Director, his passion for new materials and processes of making and a keen eye for aesthetic relevance positioned him nicely at the incubation of Nike’s future product within the Innovation Kitchen. He is now a designer at Apple. In a journey that began 12 years ago with Nike, Shaffer has designed products from a variety of categories ranging from Yoga, Dance, and Running, as well as contributing to the conceptualization of Nike Plus. Six years in, he joined the Innovation Kitchen assisting the Women’s Training team with their Diamond Flex technologies, Free, and performance calibration as their Innovation Lead. From there he transitioned to be the Innovation Lead of Sportswear where he was charged with designing, developing, and introducing technologies such as Nike’s Hyperfuse into Sportswear.
    203 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • Designer Cameron Moll on Natural Mapping
    by YouNet Company 190 0 0
    Cameron Moll discusses natural mapping at An Event Apart New Orleans 2008. Shot by Bonnemaison (http://bonnemaison.com/) of Baltimore, MD. Edited by Ian Corey. ===== CAMERON MOLL: [Talking about his uncle, a computer novice.] He bought one of those early iMacs and that was his first computing experience. He brought me over one day. He asked me to come fix something on his computer. I don't remember what it was, but I said, sure, let me see what I can do. CAMERON MOLL: So I sat down with him. This is essentially what his Finder looked like. Now, he'd never been exposed to computing before, so he didn't understand directories and lists and things like that. He treated the computer as if it were this physical object. So imagine his Finder being something just like a giant table. And he would take files and set them on the table [demonstrates] in groups and categories. CAMERON MOLL: He was big into fishing. So over here, he'd have anything related to fishing. Pictures and web addresses and so forth. Also big into airplanes, so over here, something related to airplanes and so forth. CAMERON MOLL: So if this was a physical object, his Finder, it would have been something like four by six feet. There were probably two or three times as many files as I'm showing here, I kind of recreated this. Probably had somewhere in the neighborhood of 400 to 500 files in this Finder set up just like this. CAMERON MOLL: And so I said, you know what? I can't fix this problem this other problem you've asked me to fix until I fix this one. I can't even get through these files. CAMERON MOLL: And so here's what I did. I thought I'd help him out by cleaning up that nasty arrangement of icons. [AUDIENCE LAUGHTER] CAMERON MOLL: Now I cannot articulate the look on his face when I did that. [AUDIENCE LAUGHTER] Because as you know, this is not un-doable.
    190 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • Databases are Categories 2: Refinements and Extensions
    by YouNet Company 201 0 0
    abstract: About five months ago I gave a talk here at Galois called “Databases are categories.” The basic idea was that a database schema can be represented as a category C and its states can be represented as functors C–Set. In this talk I’ll refine that notion a bit, explaining that schemas are better represented as sketches. I’ll also show how, within this model one can: deal with incomplete data; incorporate typing and calculated fields; and perform queries, define views, and migrate data between disparate schemas. That is, I’ll try to show that the categorical approach handles everything one might hope it would. Finally, I’ll discuss a linguistic version of categories, called “ologs,” and show how they may help to democratize information storage. bio: I received my PhD in mathematics from UC Berkeley in 2007; my thesis was in Algebraic Topology. For the next three years I was a post doc in the math department at the University of Oregon. During this time my focus moved toward using category theory to understand information and communication. This past summer (2010) I began a post doc in the math department at MIT. My main interest at the moment is in using category theory to bridge the gap between disparate academic fields, and to generally enhance our ability to record, process, and communicate information.
    201 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • Databases are Categories
    by YouNet Company 189 0 0
    Talk presented by David Spivak on June 3, 2010, part of the Galois Tech Talk series. See http://www.galois.com/blog/2010/05/27/tech-talk-categories-are-databases/ for slides and further information.
    189 views 0 likes 0 comments